NIZAM ERA


Here are some pictures of the Nizam State Railway buses which ran under a department called RTD (Road Transport Department.




The erstwhile Hyderabad State had many firsts to its credit as far as development and planning were concerned. The state had its own rail,road and air services to cater to the needs of its population. Here are some pictures of the Nizam State Railway buses which ran under a department called RTD (Road Transport Department.

pic no1.Nizam State Railway Bus on a Rural Route
pic no2.Nizam State Railway Bus, most likely at a village Bus Stand
pic no3.Nizam State Railway Bus moving on Hussian Sagar Bund(Tank Bund
pic no4.Nizam State Railway Bus ON Hussian Sagar Bund
pic no5.Nizam State Railway Bus ,most likely at Secunderabad Railway Stn
pic no6.Parking scene of Fateh Maidan Stadium,Public Garden in back Ground
pic no7.Nizam State Railway Bus now on display with Andhra Pradesh State Road Transport Corp
pic no8.Another Nizam State Railway Bus, now on display with Andhra Pradesh State Road Transport Corpima











Here are some pictures of the Nizam State Railway buses which ran under a department called RTD (Road Transport Department.

pic no5.Nizam State Railway Bus ,most likely at Secunderabad Railway Stn

pic no7.Nizam State Railway Bus now on display with Andhra Pradesh State Road Transport Corp
pic no8.Another Nizam State Railway Bus, now on display with Andhra Pradesh State Road Transport Corpimage0




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I remember coming across the Tank Bund and Rly. Station pics. before- the station was mentioned as not Sec'bad but Nampally. 

Also no. 7 & 8 seem to be of the same bus, I guess its in Vijaywada bus station now. I had seen it in a less cared for state a few years ago. 

Here's a small ex-NSR-RTD bus, an Albion if I'm not mistaken, put up on display (albeit open to the elements, pollution etc.) at the APSRTC head office at RTC-X-roads. 


SPECIAL COURTESEY TO MOHAMMED BHAI.SAHABA KO 

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/members/mohammed4rmhyd.html


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The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway was a Railway Company in India between 1879 to 1950, and was owned by the Dominion of Nizam or better known as the Hyderabad State.
The full style of the system was His Exalted Highness, The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway (NGSR) which had its beginnings in a line built privately by the Nizam, to the dismay of the British authorities. It was owned and worked by a company under a guarantee from the Hyderabad State, and the same company works the metre-gauge line, capital for which was raised by the issue of redeemable mortgage debentures.

      History



The Nizam Railway was built 1879. It was categorized under Indian States Railways were those built or promoted, often on similar terms to those above, by the various Princely States as by the British India. Its presence was observed in the Nizam State and the Madras Presidency of British India. From Wadi on the Great Indian Peninsula Railway, the Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway runs east to Warangal and then south-east towards Bezwada on the East Coast section of the Madras Railway. The total length of the main line is 310 miles, while two branches fromHusain Sagar to Hyderabad and from Dornakal to the Singareni coalfields add 20 miles. Hyderabad-Godavari Valley Railways (metre gauge) runs for 391 miles north-west from Hyderabad city to Manmad on the north-eastern section of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway. The State thus contains 467 miles on the broad gauge, all built before 1891, and 391 miles on the narrow gauge, opened between 1899 and 1901

Statistics

The total capital expenditure on the Nizam's State Railway to the end of 1904 was 4.3 crores, and in that year the net earnings were nearly 28 lakhs, or about 6½ per cent, on the outlay. TheHyderabad-Godavari Valley Railways has cost 2.6 crores, and earned 7.7 lakhs net in the same year, or nearly 3 per cent.; but in 1901 and 1902 the earnings had been about 3½ per cent.

Constituent lines

The Nizam's railway was divided into various sub-rail divisions.These were directly owned by the railway. These used to function under an appointed head of by the Nizam's Railway. The profits of these rail lines were enjoyed by it. These were the constituent lines within the Nizam's Railway. Some Of the important constituent lines of Nizam's Railway are:



Line[1]OpenedRoute Mileage (British Miles)Gauge
Bezwada Extension10.02.188934,5B
Belharshah-Kazipet
(= Belharshah-Warangal)
01.02.1924234,5 (completed 1928)
75,5 (1924)
B
Karipalli-Kothagudam21.03.192739,5B
Vikarabad-Bidar14.01.193091,0B
Purna Junction-Hingoli15.05.1912M
Hydarabad Gondvari Valley Rail.
(to Manmad)
21.10.1899629,8 (1922)
620,6 (1930)
M
Parbhani-Purli16.10.192963,6M
Secunderabad-British Frontier01.02.1916188,2M
Dhone Kurnool (cont. to Madras)01.01.190958,5M
The Singareni coal fields were served by branch line from Dornakal Junction, a distance of 30 km.

Bus Services


Beginning in 1932 scheduled bus services – under the auspices of the railway administration – began over 450 km with 27 vehicles. Within a decade, at a total expenses of 7½ million HRs. this was extended to nearly 500 vehicles, servicing 7200 km.[2]

                                                                                  History      



A locomotive at the Secunderabad Station (circa 192Being one of the largest princely states of India, the Nizam of the Hyderabad State wanted to build a railway line to connect the Hyderabad with the rest of the British India (now India). This Railway line was to be built from Secunderabad Railway StationHyderabad, India. The Nizam bore all the expenses for the construction of the line.The south-western corner of the State is crossed for 137 miles by the broad-gauge line from Bombay to Madras. About 120 miles of this line belong to the south-eastern section of the Great Indian Peninsula, while the remainder is part of the north-western branch of the Madras Railway, the junction being at Raichur.


Secunderabad Railway Station (circa 1948)

The proposed line was to be built between Secunderabad Railway Station-Wadi initially. The earliest sections of the NGSR were commenced during the 1870s, variously financed, constructed and operated. The construction commenced in 1870. After four years of construction works, in 1874, the Secunderabad-Wadi Line was built with financing. In 1879, the Nizam took over this railway line and was managed by the state owned Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway under the Nizam.
In 1883, a management company was formed to gradually take over these lines, under the provision of a guarantee from the Government of HEH the Nizam of Hyderabad State. Later in 1889,this line was extended to Vijayawada Junction as Vijayawada-Wadi line. In 1899, BG connection between Bezwada (Vijayawada) and Madras (Chennai Central) opens making rail travel between Hyderabad and Chennai possible.
In 1916, another railway terminus, Kachiguda Railway Station was built to serve as the railway’s headquarters. In 1930, the State of Hyderabad assumed operational control of the system. In 1950, the NGSR was nationalised and in 1951 became part of Central Railway, a zone of Indian Railways.

Extent of Nizam's railway

Atraf-i-Balda District
The District is well favoured as regards railways. The Nizam's State Railway crosses it from east to west, with six stations, and the Hyderabad-Godavari Valley line starting from Hyderabad has one station within its limits. The total length of railways is about 98 miles.
Nizambad District
The Hyderabad-Godavari Valley Railway traverses the Railways. District from the north-west to the south for 80 miles, with ten railway stations within its limits.
Medak District
The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway enters Medak from the west at Gullaguda and passes out at Lingampalli in the east, a distance of 22 miles. The Hyderabad-Godavari Valley Railway runs almost due north and south through Manoharabad, Masaipet, and Mirzapalli on the eastern border of the District.
Mahbubnagar District
The Great Indian Peninsula Railway passes through the south-western portion of the Makhtal taluk, with one station.
Nalgonda Taluk
The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway traverses the Bhonglr taluk from west-south-west to east-north-east for a distance of 21 miles, with five stations in the District.
Warangal District
The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway traverses the District from Jangaon in the west, through Kazipett and Warangal, to Yerrupalayam in the east, a distance of 146 miles, with 17 stations within the District, besides the mineral line, 16 miles long, from Dornakal to Yellandlapad, making a total of 162 miles.
Aurangabad District
The Hyderabad-Godavari Valley Railway traverses Aurangabad from west to east, for no miles, with eleven railway stations within the District.
Parbhani District
The Hyderabad-Godavari Valley Railway traverses the District from east to west for a distance of 63 miles, and has 9 stations within its limits.
Nanded District
The Hyderabad-Godavari Valley Railway traverses the District from east to west for 40 miles, with six stations.
Gulbarga District
The Great Indian Peninsula Railway line enters the District at Dudneh in the west and leaves it near Wadi junction, with a length of 50 miles. The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway, starting from Wadi junction, runs north-east and east for 115 miles.
Lingsugur District
The south-west corner of the District is crossed by the Southern Mahratta Railway.
Osmanabad District
The Great Indian Peninsula Railway line passes through a minute portion of the taluk of Tuljapur. Barsi, in the Bombay District of Sholapur, on the Barsi Light Railway, is the nearest station to the District head-quarters, from which it is 32 miles distant. There are two stations on the same line at the villages of Sendri and Uptai in the Parenda taluk.
Raichur District
The town of Raichur is the junction of the Great Indian Peninsula and the Madras Railways, which cross the District from north to south for 62 miles, with eight stations in the District.
There is no mention of railways under Karimnagar, Adilabad, Bhir and Bidar districts; obviously they had no railways through them as in 1909.
Tramways were depicted in many maps of those days, including that of Hyderabad in the Imperial Gazetteer of India, 1909.[3]
Both, 20–25 km long, one in Adilabad district and the other in Karimnagar and Warangal districts, close to rivers, obviously carried forest produce (timber?) and were closed before/during World War II.

Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway
Hyderabad-godavari valley railways.jpg
The Hyderabad State
Dates of operation1870 (1879 fully owned byNizam)–1950 (nationalized by government of India under Indian Railways)
PredecessorNewly Built line
Successor South Central Railway(1966)
Track gaugeMixed(BG and MG)
Length351 miles (1905) 688 miles (1943)
HeadquartersSecunderabad Station (up to 1916)Kachiguda Station(from 1916 to 1950)


Courtesy... 















H.E.H the vii Nizam with his family .1936
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HRH Nizam with the royal associates
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HRH Nizams modest and simple dressing ..

This eccentric Indian ruler was the world's richest man. He had 86 mistresses, 100 illegitimate sons and employed 38 staff to dust palace chandeliers.
Yet the last Nizam of Hyderabad, Sir Osman Ali Khan, also knitted his own socks, wore the same patched clothes for months and cadged cigarettes from his guests.
The crumpled turban that he always wore was in stark contrast to the £50million ostrich-egg sized diamond he used as a paperweight.
He was officially called His Exalted Highness, but was nicknamed His Exhausted Highness because of his complicated lovelife.
The last Nizam was the ruler of India's largest princely state - the size of Scotland and England combined - and was the richest man in the world until he died, aged 80 in 1967.
This week, more than 40 years later, India has finally agreed to begin negotiating a settlement between the Nizam's 470 bickering descendants over cash he left in a London bank 60 years ago.
The Muslim ruler had deposited £1million in a high street bank account in 1948 just before his kingdom was taken over by India while he pondered letting his southern state become part of Pakistan.
He kept much of his fortune, but lost most of his power.
It was a drop in the ocean for him - his wealth was then estimated at £100m in gold and silver and £400m in jewels.
But £1m then has swollen to £30m now.
So as the legal wranglings begin, the legacy of the eccentric Nizam lives on in the stories of his extreme decadence... and eccentric tightfisted frugality.
There was the time he wanted a new blanket to keep him warm and ordered a servant to buy him a new one - with strict orders not to spend more than 25 rupees (32p at today's rates).
The aide came back empty-handed because a new blanket cost 35 rupees (45p). So the Nizam made do with his threadbare old blanket.
Then there was the time he donated trunkloads of gold coins to the National Defence Fund of India and said to his workers: "I am donating the coins, not the trunks. See that they are returned."
He disciplined himself to live on the equivalent of £1 a day and smoked the cheapest brand of cigarettes, relighting and smoking the discarded butts - he once took a cigarette from an adviser, cut it in half and offered the man half back.
Yet he surrounded himself in outrageous sumptuousness. It is said he owned enough pearls to pave Piccadilly Circus in London.
In one of his many palaces he had a wardrobe half a mile long, bulging with exquisite silks, brocades, damasks and fine muslins.
Another palace had a mile-long banqueting hall. In the basement of yet another palace was an underground vault full of run-down trucks and lorries. They were stuffed full of gems, pearls and gold coins.
The Nizam, terrified of a revolution or takeover of his state, made plans to transport his wealth out of the country. But then he grew bored with the idea and left the lorries to rot.
In 1955, when he heard that mice had nibbled away £3m of old banknotes stored in trunks in a palace cellar, he shrugged off the loss.
But he also had a sensible side. He was taught English, Urdu and Persian and is credited as being the genius architect of modern-day Hyderabad, which is now one of the biggest cities in India.
His rule saw the expansion of roads, railways and the postal system, established universities, hospitals and factories.
Yet for all his intelligence and good breeding, he was not above committing the odd faux pas.
When the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VIII and, after his abdication, the Duke of Windsor visited him in 1922 he wanted to make sure he felt at home. So he arranged for his chamber pot lid to play the National Anthem when it opened.
He was also particularly vain, so had a car specially built with an elevated rear seat because he felt he should be seated higher than his subjects.
But women were his real weakness. His collection of beautiful concubines lived happily, it is said, in strict purdah, kept in complete isolation from all men - except the Nizam.
Eventually the Nizam's princely title was abolished by the Indian government in 1974.
Then crippling new taxes and land acts forced him to sell much of his property.
His obituary described him as a shambling old man who spent his last days wandering around in old slippers - but his funeral procession was one of the largest in Indian history.
The Nizam's first grandson and technically the heir to his throne, Mukarram Jam, succeeded him - but he soon found himself immersed in financial chaos.
Mukarram emigrated to Australia and spent much of his inheritance setting up a sheep farm, which failed.
In his absence, his grandfather's unsupervised Hyderabad properties were looted and precious artefacts sold in street markets for a few rupees.
What was left of the Nizam's phenomenal wealth has been used to pay off debts and maintain the lavish lifestyles of his many descendants.
And so the family's fabulous fortune crumbled.
The House of Lords said the London money could only be released if all involved parties agreed and so only now after years of legal wrangling does Mukarram look set to inherit a 20 per cent share of the fortune that has grown in the vaults of the London bank.
It means he should soon be able to afford a home far more palatial than his small two-bedroom apartment in Istanbul.
But the Nizam's five surviving wives, one of whom is a former Miss Turkey, are also set to stake their claims on his remaining cash.
India and Pakistan will share the rest of the Nizam's legacy.
He was minted yet miserly, and left a family feuding over his fortune.
Perhaps the seventh Nizam is best summed up by a British politician's wife who visited him at his peak. Her description of him was "mad as a coot".
HIS OFFICIAL TITLE (DEEP BREATH..)
His Exalted Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VII, Muzaffarul- Mulk-Wal-Mumilak, Nizam-ul- Mulk, Nizam ud Daula Nawab Mir Sir Osman Ali Khan Bahadur, Sipah Saula, Fateh Jung, Nizam of Hyderabad and of Berar, Knight Grand Commander of the Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Honorable General in the Army, Faithful Ally of the British Government.
HIS JEWEL COLLECTION
The Nizam's 173-piece jewellery collections, which was guarded by eunuchs during his lifetime, had an estimated worth of £2billion - but it was bought by the Indian government in 1995 for the knockdown price of £33m.
The most famous jewel in it is the sparkling Jacob diamond, the size of an ostrich egg that weighs 184.79 carats and is worth £50m. The Nizam wrapped it in newspaper and used it as a paperweight. His collection, displayed in India last year under heavy armed guards, also included a beautiful seven-stringed pearl necklace, known as "satlada".
HIS PERSONAL STAFF
The last Nizam had a total of 14,718 employees when he died. In his main palace alone, there were about 3,000 Arab bodyguards, 28 people paid to fetch drinking water, 38 to dust chandeliers, several specifically to grind walnuts and others whose job was to prepare addictive betel nuts for him to chew.

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H.E.H NIZAM WITH MAHARAJA OF MYSORE JAYACHAMARAJENDRA WODEYAR

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H.E.H. NIZAM WITH CLOSE RELATIVES

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NIZAM ON TIMES MAGAZINE COVER PAGE

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H.E.H The 7th Nizam of hyderabad at the court of maharaja dattia whose guest he was for a few hours on his return journey from delhi

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H.E.H Nizam VII at a Family Get togather

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H.E.H Nizam VII along with his Sons Prince Azam Jah, Prince Imdath Jah, Prince Nawazish Jah, Prince Fazal Jah and Brother-in-Law Nawab Khudrath Nawaz Jung Bhadur and other Family members

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN BAHADUR

HRH The Nizam , Worlds richest man ...!


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H.E.H NIZAM AT MEETING WITH STATE MINISTERS
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H.E.H. NIZAM BLESSING PRINCE NAWAZISH JAH

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN ADDRESSING THE PEOPLE IN DARBAR




NIZAM 7TH AT THE OPENING CEREMONY



NIZAM 7TH WITH THE NOBLES

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IN DARBAAR 

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WITH NEHRU 
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H.E.H. NIZAM WITH HIS CLOSE AIDER TAKING HIS FIRST RIDE IN A DAKOTA AT BEGUMPET AIRORT
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Nizam`s Personal Elephant

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN ADDRESSING THE PEOPLE IN DARBAR

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          REPLICA OF THE SHRINE OF IMAM ALI(A.S) NAJAF MADE WITH GOLD

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H.E.H NIZAM AT OPENING CEREMONY OF MECCA-MADINA BUILDING

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H.E.H NIZAM WITH BRITISH VICEROY AT A SOCIETY FUNCTION

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The seventh Nizam HRH , Mir Osman Ali Khan, who declared open the Hyderabad Industrial Exhibition on February 22, 1940, is seen along with the Princes, Princesses and other staff, after the opening ceremony, on the footsteps of the newly constructed Exhibition Halls of the State produce.






NIZAM STEPPING OUT OF WHAT COULD BE A HUMBER PULLMAN LIMOUSINE WHICH APPARENTLY WAS USED BY HIM

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H.E.H. NIZAM WITH HIS CHILDRENS
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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN IN 1889

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN WITH PRINCE MUKARRAM JAH BAHADUR

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN WITH HIS FAMILY




H.E.H.NIZAM WITH PRINCE MOHSIN ALI MIRZA AND PRINCESS SALEHA BEGUM AT KING KOTHI PALACE

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN WAS A GREAT PERSIAN(FARSI)PEOT.

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HEH NIZAM VII gives BRITAIN $500,000
during the war

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The Nizam Mir Osman Ali Khan Standing with Nobles and State officials

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H.E.H NIZAM AT HIS SON WEDDING PRINCE NAWAZISH JAH

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The Family Tree of the HRH Nizams ...

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rolls royce with broom sticks cleaning roads of hyderabad

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H.E.H.NIZAM WITH BRITISH VICEROY

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H.E.H The Nizam ,Osman Ali Khans Childhood photograph..

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H.E.H.MIR OSMAN ALI KHAN ON 10TH MUHARRAM AT PURANI HAVELI ATTENDING JULOOS-E-ALAM-E-BIBI

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President of Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito meeting with H.E.H. the Nizam of Hyderabad in 1956. To the right of President Tito is the late Lt Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amiruddin, Military Secretary to H.E.H. the Nizam of Hyderabad (August 1917-September 2012)

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Here is a 1914 Napier from the Nizam's garage:

The caption reads: "THE LARGEST PRIVATE MOTORCAR IN THE WORLD: A six-cylinder Napier owned by the Nizam Here is a 1914

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The enigma that was HEH Nizam Mir Osman Ali Khan .
Hyderabad: It was one of those chilly winter nights. Mir Osman Ali Khan, the seventh Nizam, feels like acquiring a new blanket and calls his ADC and orders him to buy a blanket. But there is a rider - the price should not exceed Rs. 25. The ADC goes around the bazaar and comes back crestfallen. The minimum price of a blanket is Rs. 35. When the Nizam learns this he decides to make do with the old blanket.

A few hours later, he gets a request from the Maharaja of Bikaner for a donation for the Benaras Hindu University. Without thinking twice he orders the sanction of Rs. 1 lakh! Sounds incredible. But that was the last Nizam for you. He would use the 185-carat Jacob diamond as a paperweight and at the same time settle for a simple sherwani and pyjama for a dress. Stories of his frugal habits are dime a dozen.

Defies definition 




The last Nizam of the Indian Princely State of Hyderabad with some members of the ruling family of the Qu'aiti--Sultanate (Hadramaut, southern Arabia)
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The H.E.H Nizam of the Indian Hyderabad State, Asaf Jah VII, taking the oath of office as rajpramukh

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The High Court of A.P Was inagurated by Nizam VII Mir Osman Ali Khan Bahadur the ruler of the princely state of Hyderabad.

The Plan of the High Court was drawn up by Shankar Lal of Jaipur and the engineer who executed the design was Mehar Ali Fazil. The construction started on 15 April 1915 and was completed on 31 March 1919. On 20 April 1920 the High Court building was inaugurated by Nizam VII Mir Osman Ali Khan.
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The reporting of Late H.E.H Nizam the Seventh's demise

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The Continum of The H.E.H Nizams Charitable institutions..

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Motto:

"Faithful ally"

Badge:

A head-dress. No 152 Squadron became the gift squadron of Hyderabad and took as its badge the head-dress of the Nizam of Hyderabad.




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Motto: "Nec timeo nec sperno" ("I neither fear nor despise").
Badge: Issuant from an astral crown, a demi-tiger. The demi-tiger as the crest of the Nizam of Hyderabad who presented the squadron with its original service aircraft in 1918.Authority: King George VI, August 1940.
No. 110 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Rendcombe, Gloucestershire, on 1st November 1917, crossed to France in late August/early September 1918, for duty with the Independent Force, and during the remainder of World War I was employed on long-distance day bombing with DH9A aircraft - the first squadron to employ this aircraft. Its original complement of DH9As were the gift of His Serene Highness the Nizam of Hyderabad. Each aircraft bore an inscription to that effect, and the unit became known as the Hyderabad Squadron



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Hyderabad was one of the 34 Indian Princely States allowed to mint its own metallic currency by the British Government. During to scarcity of silver during the World War I (1914-1917) and the ensuing market conditions, the Govt of India permitted Hyderabad to issue paper money in 1917. The Currency was denominated as the "Rupiya Sicca Osmania" named after the Nizam, Mir Osman Ali Khan. The notes were printed by Waterlow & Sons Ltd, London with the text printed in Urdu called 'Karansi Note Sarkar-e-Ali'. The date on the notes were as per Fasli (from Fasl ie harvest) calendar that was introduced by the Mughals in Deccan and continued by the Asif Jah rulers of Hyderabad.

The Rupee 1,000 note was issued in 1926. It was printed by Waterlow & Sons Ltd, London till their contract terminated in 1936. From 1938, the Govt of India security press at Nasik printed these notes
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Laying of the foundation stone of the Unani Hospital in Hyderabad (Deccan). Standing: The Nizam Asaf Jah VII. (left), the finance minister Akbar Hydari (right)
1933

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H.E.H The Nizam H.E.H Nawab Mir Osman Ali Khan Bahadur Asif Jah 7th Image on a match box..

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FOR PICTURES SPECIAL THANKS TO ....

https://www.facebook.com/pages/HEH-Nawab-Mir-Osman-Ali-Khan-Bahadur-Asif-Jah-7th/169685723124336












2 comments:

  1. Prince Mohsin Ali Khan now lives in London.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Prince Mohsin Ali Khan now lives in London.

    ReplyDelete